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Chess Rules, free chess game
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Pawn en Passant

End Game

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Algebraic Notation

Q: I have seen where there are letter-number combinations designating specific squares on chessboards. I will appreciate your explaining how this system works.

A: There are actually two systems one descriptive, and one geometric. The geometric grid is more commonly used, but I personally prefer the descriptive.

In the geometric, each square is given a grid designation:

8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
a b c d e f g h

Each type of piece has its own designation:

P = pawn
R = rook
N = knight (because the King is k)
B = bishop
Q = queen
K = king

When a move is described, the turn number leads the way, followed by the white piece designation and square he is on followed by a dash telling where the piece ended up. This is followed by a comma and the same information for black's move. This is all done from the point of view of white. Pawn moves usually leave off the P as they are assumed. It would look something like this:

1. d2-d4, Ng8-f6

This has the white pushing out his queen pawn two squares and black responding with his king's knight.

I think that this gives you the gist of it.

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Rules of Chess | General Rules | Chess Setup | Pawn Rules | Rook Movement | Knight Movement | Bishop Movement
Queen Movement | King Movement | Castling in Chess | Pawn En Passant
End Game in Chess | Frequently Asked Questions


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